How Silverton Health told the truth — like a good brand should

Our client, Silverton Health is a hospital system in Silverton, Oregon. When you think of hospitals it’s not long before lawsuits come to mind. Quality care shows glaring mistakes by contrast. Just this week Silverton had to admit that a mistake in maintenance procedures caused many people to be exposed to potential skin burns. Filters were not replaced on halogen lamps in the operating rooms of the system. Admitting this opened them up to potential litigation. Instead of covering it up, Silverton did the right thing and admitted the mistake openly in the press. They also took steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again—without firing a single person. In this age of the 24 hour news cycle and Monday morning punditry, Silverton went the way of leadership instead of fear. We give kudos to our client—especially the way it was managed with the press by the executive team. Doing good is good. Below is a quote from a recent Salem Statesman article on this subject.

Research has shown that hospitals that take part in early disclosure and communication when bad things happen actually do experience a decrease in litigation.

So, doing the right think, owning up to your mistakes and acting human instead of like a corporate behemoth is a good thing. Who knew?

How creative is your office space?

I was interested in an article I found on CMO.com by Sofie Sandell. Her beat is the cross between the new digital world and creativity. There are a lot of those gurus out there. But there was a particular part of her piece about creativity and the office space and how it informs how open to innovation and creativity we are as a culture. Recently Leopold Ketel revamped our own office space and we decided to do something with our display windows. You can see the result above. We’re still working on our interior but the high ceilings and the brick walls say “creative” every time someone walks in the doors.

Here is the relevant quote from the article:

As a professional speaker I travel a lot and visit both new hotels and new businesses all the time. One of the things that you pick up on when you enter a building is the art and symbols on display. Last week I visited a government agency that is trying its best to be creative. The office looks great and wouldn’t look out of place in an interior design magazine. But something was missing. There were no symbols that I could connect with the people working there.

The opposite is Twitter’s London office. When you enter reception you see two big art pieces that are made up of the tweets of the people working there. It looks great and it’s a clear symbol that the people working there matter. It gives them freedom and the right to express themselves.

Art and symbols give us a sense of belonging and identity and if they are effective they support the way we work together.

In my discussion with Derek Cheshire he also said: ‘Visualize walking into a nursery for children; the children’s art is all over the walls. It makes the place feel alive and makes all of the children visible. Imagine if you could do the same in a workplace.’

You can find more here

Local News That Matters

 

Here’s our latest work for The Oregonian. We are happy to help local journalism in Portland because it does indeed matter.

When Christian Anderson III became publisher of The Oregonian four years ago, Olga Haley and I had a conversation about the state of journalism. Olga, being a former reporter was concerned about the state of local reporting. At that time it was widely believed that newspapers would no longer exist due to the disruption of the internet; Craigslist and the Huffington Post killed the newspaper man. Now that we have engaged with The Oregonian, we know that is no longer true. Reporting will survive in some form and I believe that newspapers will as well. We are still writing that story.

Low Budget. High Impact.

 

This little 10 second ad has people calling the stations and asking when it will be on again.

Who says a small budget can’t have a big idea?

The Fast and Furious method of marketing agency selection

Jeff Goodby, principal of legendary ad agency Goodby Silverstein & Partners gives very practical advice to Chief Marketing Officers: choose your marketing partner quickly and get the job done.

If you need a search consultant to help you make this decision, fine. Tell him or her that you want to have an agency in a month. One month. Tell the agency you want the new campaign a month after that. Watch. It will happen. And it will be good.

Amen to that. Here is the complete article in Forbes

Our holiday card to the city

This was the first window dressing we designed for our building. It was a little controversial but we got lots of great comments.